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Download PDF of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone and Learn from the Legendary Teacher Emory Remington



Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone: What are they and why are they important?




If you are a trombone player, you have probably heard of Remington Warm-Up Studies, or at least seen them in some music books or websites. But what are they exactly, and why are they so widely used and recommended by trombone teachers and professionals? In this article, we will answer these questions and show you how to use Remington Warm-Up Studies effectively to improve your trombone playing skills.




Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone download pdf



What are Remington Warm-Up Studies?




Remington Warm-Up Studies are a collection of exercises for trombone that were developed by Emory Remington (1892-1971), a legendary trombone teacher at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. Remington taught at Eastman from 1922 until his retirement in 1970, and during that time he influenced generations of trombonists who went on to become prominent soloists, orchestral players, jazz musicians, educators, and composers.


Remington's teaching philosophy was based on a "singing style" of playing, which aimed to produce a smooth, rich, and expressive tone on the trombone that resembled the human voice. He also emphasized a natural and relaxed approach to breathing, tonguing, slide technique, flexibility, legato, high register, and musicality.


To help his students achieve these goals, Remington created a daily routine of warm-up studies that covered all aspects of trombone playing. These studies were not written down by Remington himself, but were passed on orally and by demonstration to his students, who then transcribed them and shared them with others. Over the years, several versions and variations of Remington Warm-Up Studies have been published and circulated, but the core principles and exercises remain the same.


Why are Remington Warm-Up Studies important?




Remington Warm-Up Studies are important because they provide a comprehensive and systematic way to practice the fundamentals of trombone playing. By practicing these exercises regularly and correctly, you can improve your tone, intonation, articulation, range, endurance, flexibility, and musical expression. You can also prevent or correct bad habits, such as tension, stiffness, or inconsistency.


Remington Warm-Up Studies are suitable for trombone players of all levels, from beginners to advanced. They can help you develop a solid foundation of basic skills, as well as refine and polish your existing abilities. They can also prepare you for playing more challenging repertoire, such as etudes, solos, or orchestral excerpts.


Remington Warm-Up Studies are not only beneficial for your technical development, but also for your mental and musical growth. By practicing these exercises with attention, concentration, and imagination, you can enhance your awareness, sensitivity, and creativity. You can also learn to listen more carefully to yourself and others, and to communicate more effectively with your audience.


How to use Remington Warm-Up Studies effectively




To get the most out of Remington Warm-Up Studies, you need to follow some guidelines and tips on how to use them effectively. Here are some of the most important ones:


The warm-up routine




The warm-up routine is a short period of time, no more than 10 minutes, where you begin to get air flowing, lips vibrating, mind engaged, etc. It should not be confused with a regular, more extensive practice of fundamentals (section II), where you refine the basics of your playing.


The warm-up routine should consist of some easy and familiar exercises that cover the mid-range of the trombone. You can start with some gentle buzzing on the mouthpiece or the rim alone, followed by some simple tunes or sirens on the instrument. The goal is to establish an easy flow of air through the lips and a centered and consistent sound.


Some examples of warm-up exercises are shown below. You can do a few of them or invent your own as well. The key is to play them with relaxation and ease.



1 ?42 b œb œœ œbU œU œ œ œ buzzgently,gliss. œU continue lowerOn the instrument, relaxed breath, sometimes breath attack, play easily 2 ?2 b œ q = c. 4 buzz gently, gliss. 44 - 64 œœ œ bU œ œ œ.U = ?2 q 44 - 64 uzz gently, gliss. 4 œ # œœ U . b œb œœ œ.bU continue lower chromatically, ascend too = q 3 ?2 uzz gently, gliss. Cichowicz-ish 4 c.œ 44 - 64œœ œœ œ Uœ . b œœ œ b œb œb œUœ . œ œ.bU?42 b œ buzzœ gently, œ gliss.œ œ.U continue higher chromatically, descend too 4 ?4 4 œœ = 66œ b w buzz/play œ œ # œ w Stamp.continue down chromatically h = c.665 ?C articulation,invert the exercise, get creative. Remington ?œ œ œ œ œ b œ œ œ œ # œœ œ œ # œœ œ œ # œœ œ etc. 6 ?44 b œœ buzz/playsome œ œ chooseother œ partials too œ œ b œœ œ œ ōe ōe ōe ōe ōe ōe etc.


You can also use some supplemental material for your warm-up routine, such as:



  • Chicowicz - Flow Studies (for trumpet)



  • Remington - Warm-ups



  • Schlossberg - Daily Drills and Technical Studies



œ b œ b œ b œ b œ b œ b œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ?œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ. = 60 - 120 double tonguing œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.œ.# # .# .# .# .# .# .# .# .# .# .# # .# .# .# .# .# .# .# .# .b b .b .b .b .b .b .b .b .b .b b .b .b .b .b .b.b.# #. #.#.#.#.#.#.#.#.#.# #. #.#.#.#.#.#.#.#.#. 8 ?44 b œ.. œ.. œ.. œ.. = 60 - 120 triple tonguing œ.. œ.. #.. #. #.. #.. #.. #. #.. #.. b.. b b.. b.. b.. b b.. b.. #.. #. #.. #.. #.. #. #.. #.. 9 ?44 b = 60 - 120 multiple tonguing œ... œ... œ... œ... œ... œ... #... #. #... #... #... #. #... #... b... b b... b... b... b b... b... #... #. #... #... #... #. #... #...


The sound concept




The sound concept is the idea of the ideal trombone tone that you want to produce and hear. It is influenced by many factors, such as your physical characteristics, your musical preferences, your equipment, and your environment.


To develop a good sound concept with Remington Warm-Up Studies, you should listen to and imitate the sound of great trombone players that you admire. You should also record yourself and listen critically to your own sound. You should also experiment with different mouthpieces, mutes, and settings to find the best combination for your sound.


Some tips to improve your sound concept are:



  • Play with a relaxed and open embouchure that allows the air to flow freely through the lips.



  • Play with a consistent and focused airstream that supports the vibration of the lips.



  • Play with a resonant and balanced tone that blends well with other instruments.



  • Play with a clear and pure tone that avoids unwanted noises or distortions.



  • Play with a rich and warm tone that has a good core and overtones.



  • Play with a flexible and expressive tone that can adapt to different styles and moods.



  • Play with a confident and projecting tone that can be heard clearly in any situation.



The flexibility factor




The flexibility factor is the ability to move smoothly and accurately between different notes and registers on the trombone. It is essential for playing slurs, leaps, glissandos, and fast passages.


To practice the flexibility factor with Remington Warm-Up Studies, you should focus on the following aspects:



  • The air speed: Your air speed should vary according to the register you are playing in. You should use faster air for higher notes and slower air for lower notes. You should also use more air for louder dynamics and less air for softer dynamics.



  • The lip tension: Your lip tension should also vary according to the register you are playing in. You should use more tension for higher notes and less tension for lower notes. You should also use more tension for louder dynamics and less tension for softer dynamics.



  • The slide movement: Your slide movement should be smooth and precise when you change notes or positions on the trombone. You should avoid jerky or inaccurate movements that can cause intonation or articulation problems.



  • The partial selection: Your partial selection should be correct and consistent when you play different notes on the same position on the trombone. You should avoid skipping or cracking partials that can cause sound or pitch problems.



Some examples of flexibility exercises are shown below. You can practice them at different speeds and dynamics.



10 ?44 b œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ = 60 - 120 œ œ œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # œ # # œ # œ b œ b œ b b œ b œ b œ b œ b b œ b œ # œ # œ # # œ # œ # œ # œ # # œ # œ # œ # 11 ?44 b = 60 - 120 œœœœœœœœ w œœœ#œ#œ#œ w #œ#œ#œ#œ# w #œ#œbœbœb w bœbœbœbœb w bœbœ#œ#œ# w #œ#œ#œ#œ# w #œ#œ#œ w 12 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w


The legato approach




The legato approach is the way you play smooth and connected notes on the trombone. It is important for playing melodies, lyrical passages, and expressive music.


To practice the legato approach with Remington Warm-Up Studies, you should focus on the following aspects:



  • The air flow: Your air flow should be continuous and uninterrupted when you play legato notes. You should avoid stopping or changing your air flow between notes.



  • The tongue action: Your tongue action should be minimal and subtle when you play legato notes. You should avoid using a hard or heavy tongue that can create gaps or accents between notes. You should use a soft or light tongue that can create a smooth transition between notes.



  • The slide technique: Your slide technique should be smooth and coordinated when you play legato notes. You should avoid moving your slide too early or too late that can cause glissandos or breaks between notes. You should move your slide at the right time that can create a seamless connection between notes.



  • The musical expression: Your musical expression should be natural and elegant when you play legato notes. You should avoid playing legato notes with a dull or flat sound that can lack emotion or interest. You should play legato notes with a singing or vocal sound that can convey emotion and interest.



Some examples of legato exercises are shown below. You can practice them at different speeds and dynamics.



13 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w ww ww ww ww ww ww ww w ww ww ww ww ww ww 14 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w ww ww ww ww ww ww ww w ww ww ww ww ww ww 15 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w www www www www www www www w www www www www www www


The high register security




The high register security is the ability to play high notes on the trombone with ease and confidence. It is challenging for many trombone players, but it can be improved with proper practice and technique.


To practice the high register security with Remington Warm-Up Studies, you should focus on the following aspects:



  • The air support: Your air support should be strong and steady when you play high notes. You should use more air pressure and less air volume for high notes. You should also use a faster and narrower air stream for high notes.



  • The lip aperture: Your lip aperture should be small and firm when you play high notes. You should use more lip tension and less lip vibration for high notes. You should also use a smaller and higher lip opening for high notes.



  • The mouthpiece placement: Your mouthpiece placement should be optimal and comfortable when you play high notes. You should avoid placing your mouthpiece too high or too low on your lips that can cause strain or fatigue. You should place your mouthpiece in the center of your lips or slightly higher, depending on your preference.



  • The mental attitude: Your mental attitude should be positive and relaxed when you play high notes. You should avoid being afraid or tense of high notes that can cause stress or failure. You should be confident and calm of high notes that can cause success or improvement.



Some examples of high register exercises are shown below. You can practice them at different speeds and dynamics.



44 b = 60 - 120 w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 17 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w ww ww ww ww ww ww ww w ww ww ww ww ww ww 18 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w www www www www www www www w www www www www www www The relaxation principle




The relaxation principle is the idea of playing the trombone with ease and comfort, without any unnecessary tension or effort. It is crucial for playing with a good tone, technique, and expression.


To practice the relaxation principle with Remington Warm-Up Studies, you should focus on the following aspects:



  • The body posture: Your body posture should be balanced and aligned when you play the trombone. You should avoid slouching or leaning that can cause poor breathing or sound. You should stand or sit straight with your feet flat on the floor and your shoulders relaxed.



  • The breathing mechanism: Your breathing mechanism should be natural and efficient when you play the trombone. You should avoid holding or forcing your breath that can cause pressure or fatigue. You should breathe deeply and freely from your diaphragm and use your abdominal muscles to control your air flow.



  • The embouchure formation: Your embouchure formation should be stable and adaptable when you play the trombone. You should avoid changing or tightening your embouchure that can cause inconsistency or strain. You should keep your embouchure firm but flexible and adjust it slightly according to the register and dynamic you are playing.



  • The slide motion: Your slide motion should be smooth and precise when you play the trombone. You should avoid jerking or slamming your slide that can cause noise or damage. You should move your slide with your wrist and elbow and use your fingers to grip the slide lightly.



  • The mental state: Your mental state should be calm and focused when you play the trombone. You should avoid being nervous or distracted that can cause mistakes or frustration. You should be confident and attentive that can cause improvement or enjoyment.



Some examples of relaxation exercises are shown below. You can practice them at different speeds and dynamics.



19 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w w w w w w w w w w w w w w w 20 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w ww ww ww ww ww ww ww w ww ww ww ww ww ww 21 ?44 b = 60 - 120 w www www www www www www www w www www www www www www


Where to find Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone




If you are interested in finding Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, you have several options to choose from. Here are some of them:


The Accura Music editions




Accura Music is a music publisher that specializes in trombone music. They publish two different editions of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, one in manuscript form and one engraved by Donald Hunsberger.


The manuscript edition (AM 111) is the original version of the exercises, as transcribed by Remington's students. It contains 12 pages of warm-up studies in a 9" x 12" format.


The engraved edition (AM 282) is a revised and expanded version of the exercises, edited by Donald Hunsberger, a former student of Remington and a renowned conductor and educator. It contains 70 pages of warm-up studies in a 9" x 12" format, as well as some interviews with Remington where he explains his teaching philosophy and methods.


You can order these editions from Accura Music's website or from other online retailers.


The online resources




There are also some online resources where you can find more information, videos, and PDFs of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone. Here are some of them:



  • The University of Colorado Boulder Trombone Studio website has a PDF file of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, as well as some other warm-up and fundamental exercise materials for trombone.



  • The YouTube channel of Christopher Bill, a professional trombonist and educator, has a video series where he demonstrates and explains how to play Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone.



  • The Slide Area website has a PDF file of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, as well as some other trombone exercises and resources.



Conclusion




Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone are a collection of exercises that can help you improve your trombone playing skills in many ways. They can help you develop a good tone, technique, and expression, as well as a solid foundation of fundamentals. They can also help you prepare for playing more advanced repertoire and music.


To use Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone effectively, you need to follow some guidelines and tips on how to practice them correctly and efficiently. You also need to have a good sound concept, a positive mental attitude, and a musical goal in mind.


If you want to find Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, you can choose from different editions and formats, such as the Accura Music editions or the online resources. You can also listen to and learn from other trombone players who use Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone.


If you are interested in downloading a PDF copy of Remington Warm-Up Studies for Trombone, you can click on the link below and get it for free. You can also share this article with your friends and fellow trombone players who might benefit from it.


Thank you for reading this article and happy practicing!


FAQs





Q1: Who was Emory Remington?


  • A1: Emory Remington was a legendary trombone teacher at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. He taught at Eastman from 1922 until his retirement in 1970, and during that time he influenced generations of trombonists who went on to become prominent soloists, orchestral players, jazz musicians, educators, and composers. He was known as "The Chief" by his students and colleagues.




Q2: What is the difference between warm-up and fundamental exercises?


  • A2: Warm-up exercises are short and easy exercises that you do at the beginning of your practice session to get your air flowing, lips vibrating, mind engaged, etc. Fundamental exercises are longer and more challenging exercises that you do after your warm-up to refine and polish the basic skills of your playing, such as tone, intonation, articulation, range, endurance, flexibility, etc.




Q3: How long should I practice Remington Warm-Up Studies each day?


  • A3: There is no definitive answer to this question, as it depends on your level, goals, time availability, etc. However, a general recommendation is to practice Remington Warm-Up Studies for about 30 minutes to an hour each day, divided into two sections: warm-up (10 minutes) and fundamentals (20-50 minutes). You can also vary the exercises, speed, dynamics, etc. according to your needs and preferences.




Q4: Can I use Remington Warm-Up Studies for other brass instruments?


  • A4: Yes, you can use Remington Warm-Up Studies for other brass instruments, such as trumpet, horn, euphonium, or tuba. However, you may need to transpose or adapt some of the exercises to fit the range and characteristics of your instrument. You may also need to use different mouthpieces or mutes to achieve the best sound possible.




Q5: How can I get feedback on my performance of Remington Warm-Up Studies?


A5: One of the best ways to get feedback on your performance of Remington Warm-


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